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A Short Reply to Brian Abasciano on John 3:16

James N. Anderson has replied to Abasciano here.

I want to briefly illustrate Abasciano’s co-text myopia.

Abasciano claims that πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων (pas ho pisteuōn, “whoever believes”) grammatically conveys indefiniteness. It actually does not, at least as it is realized in this particular discourse of John.

If Abasciano wants to be consistent then he must conclude that John is teaching that everyone believes in something, qua belief, regardless of what someone believes. So someone could believe in the tooth fairy, according to Abasciano’s insistence of disconnecting the notion of indefiniteness from its co-text delimiters.

Abasciano and Arminians isolate the phrase πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων. But the entire subject of the clause is not πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων; rather it is πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων εἰς αὐτὸν. They conveniently leave out εἰς αὐτὸν.

Next time you listen to an Arminian, notice how they break up the subject of this clause by disconnecting and isolating πᾶς ὁ πιστεύων from εἰς αὐτὸν.

This rules out the tooth fairy since it refers to those (not indefinite) who believe in Jesus.

In short, this point in John 3:16 is teaching the object of belief, not the originator of belief.

 

Regards,
Alan E. Kurschner

 

 

Daily Bible Reading Plan for 2018

It is about that time of the year when we are introduced to creative ways to read our Bible for the next calendar year. Did you do it this year?

This is my tenth year encouraging others to take each day of the year to read and reflect on a single unit in the Gospels. Did you know there are about 365 units in the Gospels? In the past, I cited five good reasons to own a Gospel Synopsis. The fifth reason is:

“Read a synopsis in one year by reading one pericope [a gospel unit] every day. By coincidence, the synopsis contains 367 pericopes. That is, all four Gospels combined contain 367 units.

Get the following edition soon before the first of year so you are ready to go: Synopsis of the Four Gospels

 

The Apostle Paul’s Simple Response to Brannon Howse

There is a lot of fearmongering going on over at Brannon Howse’s “Worldview Weekend” ministry in recent times.

Mr. Howse has been consumed by an unchristian fear, including his guilty-by-association conspiracy mind-set. The Gospel has been neglected and tarnished by Howse’s misguided, personal attack against James White and Alpha & Omega ministries. His thin-skinned, protracted assaults are only hurting Howse and his ministry—and of course the Gospel. Sadly, he does not see this. It is unbecoming of a Christian ministry.

As Christians we should not be so consumed by the intentions of the unregenerate (e.g. “Does this Muslim really intend to hurt me?”). Instead, our duty is to faithfully proclaim the Gospel of Christ. We proclaim and pray that God’s glory will be revealed.

Fear will paralyze us, but faith will express the sorts of things that Paul did not fear:

“Who will separate us from the love of Christ? Will trouble, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written, “For your sake we encounter death all day long; we were considered as sheep to be slaughtered.” No, in all these things we have complete victory through him who loved us! For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor heavenly rulers, nor things that are present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in creation will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Rom 8:35–39)

Christian, there is a day coming in this country when we will have no legal recourse.

As a Christian do you really want to go out of this world fearfully exclaiming, “My rights have been violated!”?

Or do you want to confidently in faith take that one, and last, opportunity to stand firm and give God glory in your persecution or even martyrdom?

“If anyone is meant for captivity, into captivity he will go. If anyone is to be killed by the sword, then by the sword he must be killed. This requires steadfast endurance and faith from the saints.” (Rev 13:10)

 

Does God Forgive the Unrepentant? – The Dubious Textual Variant, ‘Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing’

A few years back I posted an article explaining the weak textual evidence of Luke 23:34a, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.”

This week is Good Friday and many sermons will be using this verse, so I think it is appropriate to bring awareness of its textual nature.

Whether you agree with me or not, pastors and Christians should still be aware of this textual issue and its larger theological implications, especially the important question of whether forgiveness is conditional or unconditional.

Here is the article:

 

From the Lips of Jesus or a Scribal Hand? “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing”

 

2017 Bible Reading Plan — Read the Gospels Every Day

It is about that time of the year when we are introduced to creative ways to read our Bible for the next calendar year. Did you do it this year?

This is my ninth year encouraging others to take each day of the year to read and reflect on a single unit in the Gospels. Did you know there are about 365 units in the Gospels?

In the past, I cited five good reasons to own a Gospel Synopsis. The fifth reason is:

Read a synopsis in one year by reading one pericope [a gospel unit] every day. By coincidence, the synopsis contains 367 pericopes. That is, all four Gospels combined contain 367 units.

Get the following edition soon before the first of year so you are ready to go: Synopsis of the Four Gospels